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Discussion Starter #1
Freezing the action

The most important requirement for freezing the movement is the short exposition time. The main thing is to be aware of the speed of the object along with its direction. Differentiate whether the object is a person going at an even tempo, or if it is a car traveling at full speed. According to speed and direction of movement against the camera we chose the exposition times - for a moving figure 1/250 would be enough, for a moving car at least 1/1000. When changing the exposition time we discover that a low aperture number does not ensure a sufficient depth of focus of the shot. To help in this would be a change of film within the camera to a higher ISO, even 800 if possible, for digital cameras we change the settings ISO to a higher value of 400, in some cases 800 and more. Another possibility is to use the so-called sport mode, which is made for photographing dynamic scenes.

Find yourself a suitable position for the photography, and if possible, use the manual focus - aim toward the place where you think the action is about to take place and be shot. This is how you avoid the delayed reaction of the camera which needs a slightly longer time to focus. It may occur that the moment which gets exposed is when the object is outside the field of vision. If you do not have the chance to employ the manual focus mode, then a few seconds before the object to be photographed appears in the field of vision you lightly press start, the camera focuses and sets the exposition, now you just wait for the proper moment of exposition. The camera will be prepared then for a speedier reaction, and an increased chance of success for the resulting shot. Fast-moving objects are good to follow with one naked eye, and the other eye following the viewfinder of the camera.

Thanks to Photo.Box.sk
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Utilizing the movement

Currently, where the technological perfection of cameras is at such a high level that the shaky and jumpy photos have been all but eliminated from dynamic scenes, and the photos really showing action have returned to fashion. The reason could be that absolute freezing of movement does give off that somewhat unnatural feeling, to descriptive. On such photos there are often too many insignificant details which distract the attention away from the central object itself. So many photographers have come to the conclusion that if they want to truly capture a dynamic scene, the dynamics and movement must be evident in the resulting final shot.

Let us try then to implement the movement into our photos, they certainly will be more dynamic and have something more of life to them.


Utilizing movement - the intimate embrace of the couple at the crossing is emphasized by the movement of the cars
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A few guidelines:

Within the shot leave more room in front of the moving object than behind it, the object must have "room in the photo" for its movement.

If you are photographing moving objects when it is hard to predict the line of movement (dance, ballet, animals), take a step back or select a shorter focal length for the lens, so that the object will not disappear from frame. The proper cut can be done later while processing the photo.

When creating a shot, we should consider that the lack of sharp contour in the foreground or background should be balanced with color contrast or a contrast of gray tones.

In any case, do not rely on one photo. The movement of the camera during exposition is not always on the same line, nor at the same speed, so repeat the shot according to what is possible a few times, meanwhile, you may slightly adjust the exposition times. Not even the checking overview on the display of a digital camera will not suffice. The shot may still not satisfy after enlargement.

In closing, one very important warning - even the best photograph is not worth it if during the shot you recklessly make health risks, like under the wheels of a race car - take care to keep a sufficient distance from the moving objects or people, as the case may be.
 

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For freezing motion, if your camera has a "burst" or "continuous" mode - USE IT. A Nikon D70s can shoot a minimum of 12 Fine/Large JPEGs at about 3.5 per second, more if you have a fast memory card. This is an extremely useful way to apply TomTom's rule of never relying on a single picture when you're in a situation where you won't have a chance to reshoot; a car drifting through a corner or a player catching a ball, for example. Start your shooting just before the moment you want captured and don't let the button go until either your buffer is full or the action is over.
 

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I disagree with using high ISO for a pan shot. On digital cameras the lower ISO the sharper the picture so I rarely shoot higher than 100 during the day. I've never needed anything higher than 100 shooting a pan. F stop and shutter speed is all you need to change.
 

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Night Shots...

also i forgot to say. if your tripod is shaking a little take a plastic shopping bag and fill it with sand or dirt, tie it around the center neck of the tripod that holds the camera on the very bottom where the neck splits into the braces to the three legs, that will stop any shaking in case you do not have a timer mode or the weather isn't the best.

if you have a neck that does not split into the three legs (eg. Gitzu tripods...which are the best) you might see a hook below that you can place something there to hang, you can use your back pack or what ever...if not...just get a rope and lash it around the neck at the bottom and that should do. so long as you put a good amount of wieght on it to keep it still at slow exposure settings.

i recommend the f16/f22 at 15 and 30 seconds.
 
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